Blue Fish, Green Fish

When the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program rates a fish as green (its highest rating for sustainability) it's a good thing. When that fish is an invasive species it's even better. Such is the case for the Chesapeake Bay blue catfish, an invasive predator species eating its way through the rivers of the Chesapeake Bay.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Shrimp

Americans eat over four pounds of shrimp per person per year, but the environmental and ethical problems facing the shrimp industry are staggering. Learn all about the diminutive crustacean and find out the best ways to choose sustainably and ethically produced shrimp in this week's Real Food Right Now.

Your Summertime Fish Cheat Sheet

Imported or domestic? Wild or farmed? When did choosing fish become so difficult? We've pulled together advice on navigating some common fish options you'll likely come across at the market or fish shack. Summer goes by fast, so cut back on the pondering and get back into the sunshine with our fish cheat sheet!

Food System Recommendations Should Account for More Than Public Health

American agricultural products are used in food, fuel and other goods marketed to consumers around the world. Too often, however, policy makers and businesses overlook the implications of this interconnectivity when making decisions about food consumption here in the US. That's why a systemic approach to policymaking matters!

Ocean Acidification Spells Trouble for Shellfish Industry

Mollusks might be nervous: ocean acidification looms. As with rising mercury concentrations in fish, our fossil fueled energy choices are largely to blame. (OK, so maybe mollusks don't have feelings - but we bet you do, oyster-lovers.) What a great reason to support renewable energy!

Tuna and Mercury on the Radio

GRACE's Peter Hanlon spoke with Thom Hartmann on his radio program about our recent blog post on the FDA's new fish and mercury consumption guidance, Consumer Reports' advice on the issue and how mercury gets into fish in the first place.

Our Heroes: Sean Barrett of Dock to Dish

Sean Barrett is a founder of Dock to Dish, Long Island's first community-supported fishery and the country's first restaurant-supported fishery. The company has made it possible for a growing number of seafood lovers to establish a bond with sustainable fisheries, while opening up local markets to area fishermen.

Heroic Endeavors: Casting a Wide Net to Control an Invasive Species, Part 2

In a recent Heroic Endeavors feature, we interviewed Sharon Feuer Gruber and Wendy Stuart of the Wide Net project. The conversation ranged from marketing invasive fish species to nutrition to the current state of our food system. We liked Sharon and Wendy so much that we decided to run the rest of the interview we had with them!

Heroic Endeavors: Casting a Wide Net to Control an Invasive Species

Sharon Feuer Gruber and Wendy Stuart are the founders of Wide Net, a project that helps control Chesapeake Bay blue catfish (an invasive, non-native species) and provides a low-cost source of protein to hunger relief organizations in the Washington, DC area. Read on to find out about their other heroic endeavors.

Save Fisheries, Save Water

It sounds strange, but saltwater fish and freshwater resources are closely linked. A new study calculated for the first time just how much freshwater would be needed to replace fish and other marine protein in our diets with protein produced on land.

From Wheat to Salmon, GMOs Take Center Stage

It's been a busy few weeks of developments in genetic engineering (GE) news, each deserving of further attention - so without further ado, here's a roundup-ready (sorry, we couldn't resist) collection of the most important stories about genetically modified organisms (GMOs), as well as efforts to require their labeling.

Earth Day 2013: Facing Ocean Acidification

This Earth Day is being celebrated by collecting pictures and stories that show The Face of Climate Change. Our choice is Dr. Chris Gobler, a biologist from Stony Brook University who discusses in a video interview his important research on the effects of ocean acidification on marine life.

Hotter, More Acidic Ocean Threatens Food Security

According to a new report by Oceana, the areas most at risk from the harmful impacts of ocean acidification and climate change are poor coastal and small island nations, regions that depend heavily on seafood for protein.

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