seafood

Heroic Endeavors: Casting a Wide Net to Control an Invasive Species, Part 2

In a recent Heroic Endeavors feature, we interviewed Sharon Feuer Gruber and Wendy Stuart of the Wide Net project. The conversation ranged from marketing invasive fish species to nutrition to the current state of our food system. We liked Sharon and Wendy so much that we decided to run the rest of the interview we had with them!

Heroic Endeavors: Casting a Wide Net to Control an Invasive Species

Sharon Feuer Gruber and Wendy Stuart are the founders of Wide Net, a project that helps control Chesapeake Bay blue catfish (an invasive, non-native species) and provides a low-cost source of protein to hunger relief organizations in the Washington, DC area. Read on to find out about their other heroic endeavors.

Save Fisheries, Save Water

It sounds strange, but saltwater fish and freshwater resources are closely linked. A new study calculated for the first time just how much freshwater would be needed to replace fish and other marine protein in our diets with protein produced on land.

From Wheat to Salmon, GMOs Take Center Stage

It's been a busy few weeks of developments in genetic engineering (GE) news, each deserving of further attention - so without further ado, here's a roundup-ready (sorry, we couldn't resist) collection of the most important stories about genetically modified organisms (GMOs), as well as efforts to require their labeling.

Earth Day 2013: Facing Ocean Acidification

This Earth Day is being celebrated by collecting pictures and stories that show The Face of Climate Change. Our choice is Dr. Chris Gobler, a biologist from Stony Brook University who discusses in a video interview his important research on the effects of ocean acidification on marine life.

Hotter, More Acidic Ocean Threatens Food Security

According to a new report by Oceana, the areas most at risk from the harmful impacts of ocean acidification and climate change are poor coastal and small island nations, regions that depend heavily on seafood for protein.

Dispatch from Maryland: This Drought is Making Me Crabby

If you're from Maryland or ever lived in Maryland you've probably been to a crab feast (or crab "pick" in Virginia) and you know that Chesapeake Bay Blue Crabs are the best in the world. I was lucky enough to indulge in this summer rite of passage recently and as we picked our bushel of crabs we talked about the health of the Bay and the impact of one of the worst droughts in decades.

A Heroic Endeavor in New Orleans: the Urban Farming and Food Center

Helping New Orleans recover from Hurricane Katrina is an important national goal, but it should be achieved through new ways of thinking that will make the city healthier and more resilient. Two organizations-the Recirculating Farms Coalition and the New Orleans Food and Farm Network-are going to do that with plans to build the new Urban Farming and Food Center in the center of New Orleans.

Heroic Endeavor: Community Supported Fisheries

Much like an organic farmer, small fishermen face a similar risk - their livelihoods are at the mercy of the ocean, where there is no guaranteed steady income (not to mention the immense challenge of competing with the big distributors).

So Will That Be the Wild or Patented Salmon?

It's the year of two salmons: one genetically altered and under review by the FDA, and the other an inhabitant of one of the last great wild salmon runs (which is unfortunately situated atop a bunch of copper and gold deposits).

GE Salmon: Swimming Away with Subsidies

Despite the potential environmental threat posed by genetically engineered fish, biotech corporation, AquaBounty has received more than $2.4 million in federal research grants since 2003 to support its GE salmon project.

1 2 3 next > 35 results