cooking

Hot Fun in the Summertime: Tips for Sustainable Grilling

Throw on your apron and heat up the grill for some juicy tips on how to barbeque with sustainable meats and veggies. Grass-fed meats taste so good, especially when done just right, and seasonal produce brings tons of flavor to the table.

Heroic Endeavors: Casting a Wide Net to Control an Invasive Species, Part 2

In a recent Heroic Endeavors feature, we interviewed Sharon Feuer Gruber and Wendy Stuart of the Wide Net project. The conversation ranged from marketing invasive fish species to nutrition to the current state of our food system. We liked Sharon and Wendy so much that we decided to run the rest of the interview we had with them!

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Purslane

Tart, succulent purslane can be used like any green veggie. While many curse this juicy green as a weed, adding purslane to your kitchen arsenal brings a slightly tart and lemony flavor to salads, sauces, stews and more - perfect for the start of summer.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Papaya

Papaya is a polarizing fruit. You either love the creamy cross between a mango and a squash or are totally grossed out by the flavor. It may not be the world's most popular tropical fruit, but it's definitely giving mango and pineapple a run for their money.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Two Years of Seasonal Food

Happy birthday to us! A look back at the past two years in Real Food, our ongoing series on seasonal food, featuring cooking tips, nutritional profiles, historic and cultural background, and important information - including the environmental impact - about how each is cultivated.

Heroic Endeavors: Casting a Wide Net to Control an Invasive Species

Sharon Feuer Gruber and Wendy Stuart are the founders of Wide Net, a project that helps control Chesapeake Bay blue catfish (an invasive, non-native species) and provides a low-cost source of protein to hunger relief organizations in the Washington, DC area. Read on to find out about their other heroic endeavors.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Mint

Good chefs know that mint freshens up so much more than chewing gum, from salads and lamb to ice cream and pies; good gardeners know better than to let its wandering runners take over!

Sustainably Spring Clean Your Kitchen

At long last, spring is in the air! Time to change out sweaters and heavy jackets for something lighter. Time to open the windows and let in a little fresh air. Time to change from heavy winter foods to lighter fare. And a great time to sustainably spring clean the kitchen!

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Millet

Millet -- it's not just for birds! How did this ancient crop become synonymous with birdseed in the United States? And how did a plant once revered by the Chinese fall into obscurity? Thanks to millet's resistance to drought in an era of shifting climate, it's a grain to be rediscovered.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Oysters

They may or may not have aphrodisiac qualities, but nothing starts off a fancy - or romantic - meal like oysters. Just in time for Valentine's Day, all you need to know about these briny bivalves.

Sustainable Super Bowl Sunday

Why not upgrade your Super Bowl spread with some locally-grown, sustainably produced food this year? Step up your game with recipes from our Real Food Right Now series. Blindside your guests with tasty and healthy snacks! Clothesline anyone who tries to bring in fast food! Make sure no off-season veggies show up to play!

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Salsify

Early Americans nicknamed salsify "oyster plant" as an homage to their favorite briny bivalves (though you may not notice any oyster flavor). Don't let salsify's uninviting appearance turn you off. If you're lucky enough to get your hands on this delicious - but sometimes elusive - veggie, there are a surprising number of lovely recipes to try.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Lemons

Where would we be without lemons? They even teach us lessons: When life gives us lemons, as the saying goes, we make lemonade. They've become so ubiquitous that it's hard to believe that they are a relatively recent addition to our kitchens.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Lentils

Will this week's Real Food bring you good luck in the new year? Italians, Brazilians and Germans think so! This much we know for sure: lentils are totally ancient and ridiculously good for you.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Chestnuts

There's more to this week's Real Food than Nat King Cole. Did you know that they date back tens of thousands of years, or that the American chestnut was decimated by blight in the early 1900s? Also, learn the important DIY roasting step that'll keep them from exploding in your oven.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Turnips

Turnips remind us of the kid who got picked last in gym class. Compared to its fellow Brassica cousins, it lacks the royal pedigree of cauliflower and the modern cachet of kale. But as everything old is new again, is it poised to become a greenmarket favorite? If kale can, so can the turnip.

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