Robin Madel

Robin Madel works on water and waste issues and the food-water-energy nexus. Robin produces reports and multimedia content and is a regular contributor to GRACE's Ecocentric blog. She has been published in Huffington Post, AlterNet and Grist. Prior to GRACE, Robin worked as a Recording Secretary and Research Assistant for the city of Boulder Public Works Water and Transportation Departments and as a Project Manager at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, managing treatability studies and site cleanup projects. Robin received an MS in Environmental Science and Engineering from the Colorado School of Mines, a BS in Civil Engineering and a BA in Geological Sciences - both from the University of Colorado at Boulder and she recently completed a Certificate in Journalism from New York University. She is an avid photographer who increasingly shoots food, water and energy sustainability topics and she's also an actor, so she's usually not too far away from a camera of some sort.

Water Leak? Fix It and Forget It

According to the EPA, household leaks can waste more than 1 trillion gallons of water annually nationwide, so each spring they ask everyone to take a week and hunt down the drips and streams of wasted water. Fix-a-Leak Week is March 16-22, and it's a great time to find and fix your leaks so you can save valuable water and money all year long.

Treat Yourself (Greenly)

It's cold and snowy out. You haven't seen the sun for days. "Parks and Recreation" has ended. You know what that means? It's the perfect time to "Treat Yourself"! Here are a few relaxing suggestions to help you wash those winter blues away - sustainably.

Presidents Gone Green

America's 44 presidents have dealt with environmental and climate issues since our nation's beginning. From Thomas Jefferson to Barack Obama, here's how they've managed and grown our food, water and energy systems!

Cats, Coal and Climate Change: the Real Bird Killers

An art display in Northern Manhattan is drawing attention to some of the 314 bird species threatened by climate change. A look at the causes of bird deaths illustrates that climate change (and by extension, fossil fuels) has become a major threat to birds, after cats and power lines.

Get to Work! Jobs in Water Protection

Love water? Hunting for a new job? You might be able to make a splash with a career in water protection. Our need for water and wastewater management is only going to grow. Whether you're a scientist, an advocate, a writer or an accountant, you'll be needed!

Look Up! Water, Art Coming to a NYC Rooftop Near You

Artist Mary Jordan uses New York City's iconic water tanks to educate people about water. She's wrapping them with artwork from well-known artists to draw attention to how important and vital water is to us, even in a city surrounded by water.

Energy and Water Team Up at This Year's World Water Week

It's World Water Week and we're happy to report that this year's theme is "Water and Energy." Have a look at our curated list of recent posts that help to illustrate just a few examples of how water and energy are connected, and what that means for all of us.

Passive House: High Performance Houses for a Warmer Future

Imagine you're building a home. What if you could design it so your electric bill was next to nothing, but the home would cost you 10 percent more upfront? Would it be worth it to you? For Jennifer and Sloan Ritchie, residents of Seattle's first certified Passive House, the answer was a resounding, "Yes!"

Heroic Endeavors: Casting a Wide Net to Control an Invasive Species, Part 2

In a recent Heroic Endeavors feature, we interviewed Sharon Feuer Gruber and Wendy Stuart of the Wide Net project. The conversation ranged from marketing invasive fish species to nutrition to the current state of our food system. We liked Sharon and Wendy so much that we decided to run the rest of the interview we had with them!

Heroic Endeavors: Casting a Wide Net to Control an Invasive Species

Sharon Feuer Gruber and Wendy Stuart are the founders of Wide Net, a project that helps control Chesapeake Bay blue catfish (an invasive, non-native species) and provides a low-cost source of protein to hunger relief organizations in the Washington, DC area. Read on to find out about their other heroic endeavors.

Earth Day 2014: An Eco-Stravaganza of Sustainable Tips and Tricks (Part 1)

This Earth Day, the Ecocentric team is celebrating by sharing our favorite eco-friendly tips and tricks! Whether you're an old hand at ninja energy efficiency tactics or setting up your first apartment, hopefully you'll find, as we did, that there's always more to pick up by way of sustainable living.

Dark Water Sheds Light on Animals and Oil Spills

Dark Water, a new play now on stage in New York City, tells the story of the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico through the eyes of the animals. The play holds a mirror up to human behavior and asks, "What kind of a future do we want?" Right now it's looking like one filled with environmental disasters.

Everything You Know About Water Conservation is Probably Wrong...

A new Indiana University study illustrates how little people know about water use and the virtual water content of food. Not to worry - GRACE has you covered! Our Water Footprint Calculator can help you learn how much water you use each day while you're showering, watering your lawn and eating.

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