Megan Saynisch

Megan Saynisch is cook, gardener, culinary anthropologist and writer living in Brooklyn with her husband and young son. A graduate of the French Culinary Institute, she is the creator of the blog Brooklynfarmhouse.com.

Seasonal Food Pairings: Summer

Late summer is the heart of harvest, when peak summer produce is at its most prolific - maybe too prolific! Certain classic combinations have come to epitomize summer, but there are other, lesser-known pairings that will pull you out of the summertime rut. Here are some ideas to get your creative juices flowing in the kitchen!

7 Ways to Pack a More Sustainable School Lunch

It's back to school - is that a collective sigh of relief from parents around the nation we hear? Time to start thinking about school supplies, homework - and what to pack your kids for lunch everyday. Here are some quick tips on how to make packing a school lunch a little more sustainable.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Currants

Native to temperate regions across the world, beautiful, jewel-like currants have a long history as a food in North America. Super high in Vitamin C, the little fruits' sweet-tart flavor make great jams and jellies, and delicious additions to baked goods. Read on to learn more about this interesting summer fruit!

One Person's Trash is Another's Gluten-Free Flour

The latest hot trend in gluten-free baked goods may be coffee flour, a product that is poised for commercial roll-out sometime this year, and that may help relieve some of the food waste and water pollution associated with coffee production. Made from coffee cherry pulp, coffee flour is high in nutrients and fiber. But some coffee farmers aren't so sure about its usefulness.

Saying Goodbye to Jon Stewart (Sniff, Sniff)

Like millions of Americans, we cried ourselves to sleep last night over Jon Stewart's departure from the Daily Show. We've rounded up a few of our favorite Daily Show clips that deal with food, water and energy issues. Goodbye Jon - thanks for the laughs. (Tear)

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Shrimp

Americans eat over four pounds of shrimp per person per year, but the environmental and ethical problems facing the shrimp industry are staggering. Learn all about the diminutive crustacean and find out the best ways to choose sustainably and ethically produced shrimp in this week's Real Food Right Now.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Goat

Some are calling goat next big thing in the sustainable food world. These amazing animals produce lean meat that is tasty and good for you, and their milk is churned into butter and made into cheese. If you haven't tried goat yet, take a page from cultures across the world who know what's what: goat is delicious!

Your Sustainable Fourth of July

Planning a cookout or a picnic to celebrate our country's independence day? From burgers to ice cream to flag-shaped food, we're here to help you make this your best Fourth of July yet.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Sesame

The tiny sesame seed carries big flavor and has made its way around the world to compliment cuisines far and wide. Bringing us sweets, like soft and creamy halva, to garnishing and even composing main dishes, sesame has entered our hearts and delighted our taste buds for centuries.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Onions

It's time to give onions the Real Food Right Now attention they deserve. These pungent bulbs are the true workhorses of the kitchen and are absolutely vital to most cuisines around the world. From fresh cut red onions to pickled garnishes, there's nothing quite like their ability to transform a mundane dish into something much more intriguing.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Chickpeas

Chickpeas play an important role in many cultures of the Mediterranean, Middle East and Africa, and recently they've come center stage in the west as the base of wildly popular hummus dips. If you haven't tried yet, cooking with chickpeas may seem daunting and exotic, but they're actually fun and easy to toss on a salad, fry up in fritters or roast into a crunchy snack.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Prickly Pear

There are a great number of species of prickly pear cactus, all of which are native to the Americas. The UN's Food and Agriculture Organization explains that the cactus was probably first cultivated in Mesoamerica, and was of particular importance to the Aztec. Fossilized seeds and skins of the fruit over 7,000 years old have been found in Mexico!

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Bamboo

It's amazing that the giant panda subsists on bamboo almost exclusively - bamboo is not very nutritious, at least not for us. When it comes to munching on this unique and fascinating grass (yes! grass!), it's all about texture and flavor, and knowing how to cook it.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Kiwi

Vibrant (on the inside), juicy and perfectly scoop-able, the kiwi is just as delicious right off the vine as it is baked into a tart. But, did you know that this sweet fruit can be used to firm pie filling or tenderize meat? We didn't either! Read on to learn the history and uses of this fuzzy fruit.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Ginger

Imagine a life without the tingly, peppery, uniquely lovely bite of ginger. No worries - just rejoice in the fact that this prized spice can now be found in every grocery store across the land!

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Yuca

Also known as cassava or tapioca, yuca is the fourth most important starch in the world, prepared in a wide variety of ways from South America to Asia. Fun fact: if you love bubble tea, you may have sucked up the powdered and pearled flesh of this woody root without even realizing it.

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